Our Mission

Hallway

Our mission is to simply restore local control of our schools.  

When our state signed on to the Common Core standards, we accepted three items in the Race to the Top contract that thwarted the rights of parents and teachers having control of our schools.

We are fighting against:

  1. Nationalized Standards;
  2. High Stakes Testing;
  3. Data mining on our children & teachers.

 

These three components are what people refer to as “Common Core”.  They were created by politicians  and corporate executives who would profit off of this new nationalized education program.  New textbooks, computers, software programs, student data points, teacher data points, and even the production of the test itself would line their pockets with billions of dollars.

All Arizona public and charter schools are controlled by the purse strings of the U.S. Department of Education.  This department has been greatly influenced by corporations such as Microsoft, Pearson, Knewton, McGraw-Hill, and many others who are profiting of our tax-payer funded education system.  The U.S. Department of Education is now headed by Dr. John B. King, Jr. who is also known for encouraging greater federal control.

The cost of Common Core has been staggering!  Arizona received $25 million dollars for accepting Common Core, however, we spent over $387 million in the first two years implementing it.   And, the AzMerit (Common Core test) cost our state over $19 million the first year alone –after the test developers had already received millions of dollars from the federal government to create it.  We essentially rent each test question for a whopping $4,000 a piece!   About 6% of our education budget comes from the federal government, however it costs our state much more to satisfy their requirements.  And it is also costing us our freedom.

Parents should be the primary decision makers in their children’s education.  

Teachers should be free to do what they do best:  teach!

Our goal is to:

 1. Let local school districts and charters choose their own curriculum and standards.

local-action-excellent-schools

This will allow parents, teachers, and local school administrators to be able to choose what is best for their area needs.  Our state is very diverse in its population.  We have inner city schools, rural schools, diverse cultures & languages, reservations, and charters who all have different needs and philosophies.  Schools should be able to choose what method of teaching works best for their students.  The majority of our local educators are very intelligent and already know what a child needs to learn at each grade level.  Several of our Arizona schools were already using The Core Knowledge Sequence prior to Common Core –which is time proven and far superior.  Other schools have succeeded for decades using Spalding, Saxon, Singapore math, IEW, and many more.  The road to improving education in Arizona was already opened up when parents were allowed the choice to have their children attend schools outside of their residential boundaries.   Competition always creates improvement.  AND if we increase teacher pay and allow our teachers to teach how they want to teach, Arizona will attract and retain world class teachers.  The freedom to make choices is essential in preserving liberty.  Schools should be held accountable by parents  –not by the federal government.  Parental involvement is the most important factor to determine a child’s success in school.

2.  Bring back traditional benchmark testing that parents and teachers can view.

parents-and-teachers-at-school

Benchmark testing allows parents and teachers to see a snap shot of how their students compare with others across the state and country.  Before Arizona participated in the failed No Child Left Behind program, parents and teachers were allowed to view the classic benchmark tests such as the Iowa and Standford series. Today we have expensive, invalid, high stakes tests (such as the AzMerit & AIMS) where parents and teachers are not allowed to view the test questions.  Parents have the God-given, Natural right to view anything that their children view in a publicly funded classroom.  

3.  Protect personally identifiable student and teacher information.

protect-children

Our goal is to sever the ties of our state’s education database with the national student database called the SLDS (Statewide Longitudinal Database System).  This system is currently linked to the U.S. Department of Labor’s database.  Personal student and teacher information is being shared with companies and organizations such as Microsoft, Intel, Pearson, Knewton, and many more!   This third party data sharing was made possible when FERPA laws were recently weakened by Pres. Obama.

Yes, aggregate data is very valuable to the development of education programs and products, however personally identifiable information must never be shared!  Any sharing is in direct violation of our 4th amendment, God-given right to privacy.  Parents and teachers have the Natural right to protect their family’s personal information.  Currently, our state is not protecting our rights to personal privacy by participating in the SLDS and sharing personal information directly with third parties.

How to Bring Back Local Control of Our Schools?

  1.  REFUSE to allow your student to take the AzMerit test;
  2.   ATTEND you local school board meetings and tell them you want out of Common Core;
  3.   CONTACT your legislators.  Tell them to vote yes on our Parental Rights Bill and Opt Out Bill that will be presented to them this coming January in 2017;
  4.   DONATE to www.ItsMyPII.com to help fund the lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Education and Pres. Obama for weakening student privacy laws.

For more in depth information on the Race to the Top contract that brought us Common Core, please click on the links below:

Common Core 101

 

What is Wrong with Common Core

pdf file:  What is Wrong with Common Core?

Power Point Presentation:   What is Wrong with Common Core?

Shortened Power Point Presentation:  What is Wrong with Common Core? (short version)